Ileocecal Valve and IBS

food

The first part of the article deals with the symptoms and general treatment of IBS, i.e. through dietary changes.
The second part introduces a less well known cause and possible treatment of IBS, the adjustment of the ileocecal valve.

Disclaimer: This article is not designed to provide medical advice or professional services. It is intended to be for educational use only. The information provided in this article is not a substitute for professional care and should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. If you have, or suspect you may have, a health problem you should consult your doctor.

Part one

Quite a few people suffer from IBS – irritable bowel syndrome – and if you are one of them you will know that the symptoms can be very incapacitating.

These symptoms can include

  • abdominal pain, which may be relieved by passing wind
  • discomfort, bloating, gas
  • constipation, with cramping and difficulties to eliminate stools
  • diarrhoea, often with an urgent drive to use the toilet
  • or both of them alternating
  • mucus present in the stools
  • nausea, but without vomiting.

The symptoms can vary between patients, and also over time.

Continue reading “Ileocecal Valve and IBS”

Ileocecal Valve Syndrome

This article is about a less known source of discomfort in the lower bowels.

Check the following list:

  • flu like symptoms
  • headaches, migraines
  • tinnitus
  • diarrhea, constipation
  • bladder infection
  • lower back pain
  • right shoulder pain
  • unexplained thirst
  • nausea
  • excessive gas
  • dark rings under the eyes
  • depression, low energy

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms for any period of time, there is a chance that you are suffering from a dysfunction of your ileocecal valve, the intestinal valve that separates the small intestines from the colon.
This dysfunction is quite common, and is also dealt with under the name Ileocecal Valve Syndrome.
The ileocecal valve is a sphincter muscle in the lower right abdomen very close to the spot usually associated with the appendix. It separates the end of the small intestines – the ileum- from the first part of the large intestines – the cecum.
The ileocecal valve can show such acute painful stress that it can sometimes be confused with an inflamed appendix.

The valve is controlled by three sources: the digestion process, the nervous system, and the hormone system.

Let’s look how the ileocecal valve works during digestion.

A healthy valve would stay closed to hold the food in the small intestines until the digestion and absorption of nutrients is completed. It will then open up and let the digested food remains enter into the large intestines, the colon. Afterwards, it will close again and prevent the stuff from the colon to reenter the small intestines. In its proper function, it is designed as a one-way valve.

The working of the ileocecal valve can be disrupted in two ways:
– first, it could stay open most of the time. As a result, the food to be digested would pass through the small intestines too fast, too few nutrients would be absorbed, and the mostly undigested food would enter the colon, where bacterial processes could cause a lot of gas; and you might experience diarrhea.
– Second, the ileocecal valve could be shut most of the time. Food would the stay for too long in the small intestines, and could start to rot and cause gas in the small intestines; toxins from the rotting food could be absorbed into you system and force the liver to work overtime; you could feel bloated, and experience constipation.

Contrary to common belief, more roughage and fibre could do more harm than good, because the raw fibres can be very abrasive to the gut lining and the ileocecal valve, so that an already stressed valve can get even more irritated.
This does by no means imply that you should stop eating foods with fibre (see later). It may sound contaradictionary – but fibre is still very important for your digestion. The fibre you should avoid comes from raw uncooked food, look instead for foods with a high content in soluble fibre.

Here is a summary of all the foods that can irritate an ileocecal valve and worsen its dysfunction:

  • raw fruits and vegetables
  • beans, lentils
  • grains, seeds, nuts
  • popcorn ! – the skins act like razor blades !
  • fermented foods, like vinegar, pickles, soy sauce
  • acidic fruits, like lemons, oranges
  • onions, garlic, leeks
  • hot spices, like chili powder, curry, cayenne, ginger, pepper, cinnamon
  • caffeine, chocolate, green and black tea

If you experience ileocecal valve problems, it might be the best to avoid these foods for a period of at least two weeks. This will allow your ileocecal valve to relax, and the inflammation to heal.

To get enough fibre in this time you can eat soft cooked vegetables and fruits. Dark green leafy vegetables are the best for this diet.
The diet should consist out of five parts of cooked vegetables and fruits with two parts of protein. Meat, fish, eggs, and dairy are OK. A few table spoons full of omega-3 rich oils are recommended (walnut oil, hemp oil, flax oil).
Ideally, you should see a trained practitioner who can readjust the working of the ileocecal valve, and give you advice how to reduce any situations that could trigger any new ileocecal valve dysfunctions.

Disclaimer: This article is not designed to provide medical advice or professional services. It is intended to be for educational use only. The information provided in this article is not a substitute for professional care and should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or a disease. If you have, or suspect you may have, a health problem you should consult your doctor.

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes (diabetes mellitus type 2) is a disease where high levels of blood glucose result from defects in insulin production or insulin action. It is sometimes also called adult-onset diabetes. It usually begins as insulin resistance, a disorder in which the cells do not use insulin properly to take glucose from the blood into the cells. Over time, the pancreas may lose its ability to produce insulin at all. Diabetes type 2 is becoming more common with rising numbers of obesity and physical inactivity. The disease is commonly associated with older age, family history of diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, and ethnicity.


LEGAL DISCLAIMER: This post is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment or services. It provides general information for educational purposes only. The information provided is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and should not be used in place of a consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. If you believe you have any health problem, or if you have any questions regarding your health or a medical condition, you should consult your physician or other healthcare provider.


Treatment for Diabetes type 2

General, the first step to treat diabetes type 2 is through changes in the diet and increased exercise. If these measures are not enough to normalise your blood sugar levels, you might have to take oral medication or in some cases inject insulin. If you are overweight, loosing extra pounds will help with the treatment of your diabetes.


– Medication is not a substitute for the above lifestyle changes and a healthy diet. –


Nutritional choices for people with diabetes type 2

The aim of the diet is to avoid fluctuation of your blood sugar levels, and for some, to reduce your weight. That means to eat regularly small meals with comparable amounts of carbohydrates every day.
The advice given here can also help to lower high blood pressure which can be a dangerous side effect of diabetes. It is known that foods high in sugar and refined carbohydrates can very quickly push the blood sugar up to high levels.

Foods with complex carbohydrates on the other hand raise blood sugar levels more slowly and keep them constant for longer. This is defined by the so called glycemic index GI, whereby general foods with sugar will have a high glycemic index, and those with complex carbohydrates will have a lower glycemic index.

A glycemic index of less than 55 is considered low, 56 to 69 is considered medium, and above 70 is considered high. Overcooking can raise the GI of starchy foods. Sugar and alcohol are not forbidden in the diabetic diet, and can be eaten in small amounts. Other nutritional choices include all the foods general advised for good health: fruit, vegetables, lean meat, dairy, cereals, and unsaturated fats.


FOOD to PREFER

  • General:
    5 portion of fruit and vegetable per day; whole grain products; high fibre foods; unsaturated fats and oils; nuts and seeds; lean protein;
  • oats; natural muesli; porridge;
  • wheat pasta; brown rice; buckwheat; white long grain rice; barley;
  • sweet potatoes; new potatoes;
  • whole milk; skimmed milk; yoghurt; soy milk;
  • bread (whole wheat, sourdough rye and wheat); oatmeal crackers;
  • hummus; peanuts; walnuts; cashew nuts;
  • kidney beans; butter beans; chick peas; lentils; split mung beans;
  • peas; sweet corn; carrots; aubergine; broccoli; cauliflower; cabbage; mushrooms;
  • tomatoes; chillies; lettuce; green beans; red peppers; onions, garlic;
  • cherries; plums; grapefruit; peaches; apples; pears; dried apricots; grapes; oranges;
  • strawberries; prunes;
  • Drinks:
    herbal teas; green tea; water.

FOOD to AVOID and REDUCE

  • General:
    salt, saturated fats, trans fats, processed foods, simple carbohydrates;
  • Foods with a high glycemic index:
  • cornflakes; bran flakes; and other; sugar coated brands of breakfast cereals;
  • watermelon; dates;
  • white bread; bagel; baguette; rice cakes; donuts;
  • syrup;
  • pumpkin; parsnips;
  • short grain white rice; tapioca;
  • baked or mashed potatoes; French fries; chips.
  • Drinks:
    alcohol, soda; coffee.

SUPPLEMENTS

The body’s metabolism is very complex, and deficiency in any essential nutrient can upset the fine balance. Therefore it is important to make sure that you are getting these nutrients from your food or from supplements.

For diabetes type 2 consider taking supplements with magnesium, potassium, zinc, and the vitamins E and C.

LEGAL DISCLAIMER: This post is not designed to and does not provide medical advice, professional diagnosis, opinion, treatment or services. It provides general information for educational purposes only. The information provided is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and should not be used in place of a consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider. If you believe you have any health problem, or if you have any questions regarding your health or a medical condition, you should consult your physician or other healthcare provider.