Styling the First Post Different

How to style the first / last / latest / newest post in a WordPress site different?

The default advice usually is to use a counter variable and a conditional statement to check for the first post in the loop; that approach obviously works fine, however requires a few lines of extra code before and in the loop.

A more condensed approach is to use $wp_query->current_post which returns the current post number in the loop, starting with 0 (zero) for the first post.

This can be combined with a check, if the page is really the first page, and not one of the paginated pages, using !is_paged().

If the goal is just to apply different css styles to the first post, it is best to add a unique css class to the post_class() which is used in most recent themes; like so: post_class($extra); to add the extra class to post_class.

All combined might look like (based on the code of content.php in Twenty Eleven):

<article id="post-<?php the_ID(); ?>" <?php $extra = ( $wp_query->current_post == 0 && !is_paged() ) ? 'specialclass' : ''; post_class($extra); ?>>

If the goal is to have a totally different output for the first post, then a conditional structure is needed (within the loop, wrapping the post output):

<?php if( $wp_query->current_post == 0 && !is_paged() ) : ?>
/*the output of the first post*?
<?php else : ?>
/*the output of all other posts*/
<?php endif; ?>

Posts in Columns – A New Twist on an Old Problem

To organize posts into three columns (edit: semantically more correct would be to call it ‘three posts per row’ as this is the way the posts are organized), you first need to generate a column dependant css class for each post; this will be added to the post div within the loop.

The core trick to generate different css classes for posts in the first coliumn, the second column, and the last column:

<?php $column = ($column == '') ? 'first' : (($column == 'first') ? 'middle' : (($column == 'middle') ? 'last' : 'first' )); ?>

This line of code needs to be within the loop, just before the post div.

To achieve more or less the same, you could obviously also use a counter variable and the modulus operator, as i have elaborated on in my earlier article ‘More-Than-Zebra style WordPress loop’. However, the above method is simpler and easier to apply within a single line of code.

The second step is to add this as a css class to the post div:

a – assume a theme without the use of ‘post_class()’; the typical opening div would look like:

<div class="post" id="post-<?php the_ID(); ?>">

This is changed into:

<div class="post <?php echo $column; ?>" id="post-<?php the_ID(); ?>">

b – in a theme using the ‘post_class()’, the new code would look like:

<div <?php post_class($column); ?> id="post-<?php the_ID(); ?>">

Third and last step: to tell the browser what to do with the new css classes, add some styles to style.css of the theme:

/* .first, .middle, .last styling of posts on home page for three column */
.first, .middle, .last { width: 32%; float:left; clear:none!important; }
.first { margin-right: 2%; clear:both!important; }
.middle { margin-right: 2%; }

Final details depend on the existing theme.

edit & ps:
if you just want to mark the first post in each row – for instance to add the ‘clear:both;’ and a different margin there – try to work with:
(example for 5 columns)

<div <?php $column = ($wp_query->current_post%5 == 0) ? 'first' : ''; post_class($column); ?> id="post-<?php the_ID(); ?>">

The Death of Mystery Man

Are you fed up with the little grey mystery man or his little weird monster brothers and sisters?

You know what i mean – showing up in your comments for all those without a gravatar?

Give them the push and create your own design, supporting your own branding.

Here is how it is done:

add_filter( 'avatar_defaults', 'newgravatar' );
function newgravatar ($avatar_defaults) {
    $myavatar = get_bloginfo('template_directory') . '/images/own-gravatar.jpg';
    $avatar_defaults[$myavatar] = "Own";
    return $avatar_defaults;
}

Add the code to functions.php of your theme; get creative with your graphic; upload it into the images folder of your theme (you might need to adjust the code, if your theme images are in a different folder), and activate it as the new default comment avatar.

Life without Mystery Man will never be the same …

add_filter( 'avatar_defaults', 'newgravatar' );
function newgravatar ($avatar_defaults) {
    $myavatar = get_bloginfo('template_directory') . '/images/own-gravatar.jpg';
    $avatar_defaults[$myavatar] = "Own";
    return $avatar_defaults;
}

Category Archive Navigation

A simple next/previous category navigation for the category archive; particular useful if you use your categories to organise your blog, for instance your products, or photos…

<?php
foreach(get_categories() as $all_cat) {  $cat_ids[] = $all_cat->term_id; }
 $this_cat = get_query_var('cat');
 $this_cat_position = array_search( $this_cat, $cat_ids ); ?>
<div>
<div>
<?php $prev_cat_position = $this_cat_position -1;
 if( $prev_cat_position >=0 ) {
 $prev_cat_id = array_slice( $cat_ids, $prev_cat_position, 1 );
 echo '<a href="' . get_category_link($prev_cat_id[0]) . '">&laquo; ' . get_category($prev_cat_id[0])->name . '</a>'; } ?>
</div>
<div>
<?php $next_cat_position = $this_cat_position +1;
 if( $next_cat_position < count($cat_ids) ) {
 $next_cat_id = array_slice( $cat_ids, $next_cat_position, 1 );
echo '<a href="' . get_category_link($next_cat_id[0]) . '">' . get_category($next_cat_id[0])->name . ' &raquo;</a>'; } ?>
</div>
</div>

the above has a commonly used html structure to help with formatting.